Frontotemporal Dementia

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Frontotemporal Dementia


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What is frontotemporal dementia?

What are the symptoms of frontotemporal dementia?

How is frontotemporal dementia diagnosed?

What are the treatments for frontotemporal dementia?

 

What is frontotemporal dementia?

Frontotemporal dementia refers to a group of conditions in which there is a deterioration of the frontal (front of the head) lobe, the temporal lobe (side of the head), or both. They are caused by a variety of different types of changes in brain cells. An older term for one form of frontotemporal dementia is Pick’s disease.

 

What are the symptoms of frontotemporal dementia?

There are two main forms of frontotemporal dementia:

Behavioral Variant
The most striking symptom is a change in personality. Patients cannot adjust their behavior to the social context and so often act inappropriately. Other patients seem to lose all interest in the world around them.

Language Variant
Patients have trouble speaking or finding words.

 

How is frontotemporal dementia diagnosed?

The doctor relies on the patient’s medical history and a physical examination to reveal behavioral or language symptoms typical of frontotemporal dementia. CT, MRI, and PET typically show disease in one or both of the frontal and temporal lobes.

 

What are the treatments for frontotemporal dementia?

Presently, no specific treatments for frontotemporal dementia are available. Doctors sometimes try treating patients with Memantine (Namenda®) and other drugs for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

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350 W. Thomas Road
Phoenix, AZ 85013
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